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20130101
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
independence. sunday night at 8:00. >> next, george will talked about the relationship between religion and american politics. he is introduced by john danforth. this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united natio
is what is coming out this christmas day. george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then, singer/songwriter james taylor from a recent appearance of the national press club. after that, first lady michelle obama holds a holiday party with goldstar families. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handed leaflets for robert kennedy, and i always say when i was 10 and made the decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay, who was running for mayor of new york. i went to the liberal party headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in the new york. someone thought it was really cute, a little boy handed out leaflets, and she ask me why, and then made the case and the case against the opponent as well, and she said this was for you, and she handed me a box that looked like pastries, the white box with strings. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters, and there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. in one of my early lessons in politics, the district leader grabbed the money and he said
religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put je'us on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without any at all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson become consumed with revising the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book 'ith? >> well, presumably it's not because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and paed a took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. heelieved jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesus, say no to christianity and say yes to yeast. >> how many of the colonists, what percentage were religiously affiliated or ha
. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work for him at republican headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white h
:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. columnist in a news analyst talks about the relationship with religion and american politics. he was introduced by the former missouri senator and ambassador to the united nations and john danforth. from washington university, this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special co
between religion and politics. james taylor and his recent appearance at the national press club. later, michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was h
not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get in line with everybody else. with respect, i disagree with what you just said. the religious right, which i obviously am not a member, rose after the religious left in the form of the reverend martin luther king and jesse jackson, etc., etc. the religious right was provoked into politics. the tradition among many protestants was political quietism. and then the supreme court decided that the constitution required that there be at exclusion of religion from the public square in the removal of prayer from schools. deeply offended a great many americans. 40 years ago, next month, they delivered the final provocation for the legitimate political purpose of trying to save the
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded on the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestantism. by the 20 century, catholics and jews played an important role, the culture 1900 was still fundamentally protestant, and even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced a second exceptional pillar, common law, which posits that god-given, or the laws given from god to the people and it bubbles up word to the rumors. it gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common-law stand in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law come in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars
of the world's great religions: buddhism, the fourth largest religion in the world. he was the son of a king, a pampered prince who abandoned a life of pleasure to seek enlightenment. >> even buddha himself in order to get final enlightenment need hard work. >> gere: it was an arduous spiritual journey. >> he was eating one grain of rice per day. he was standing on one foot. he was sleeping on nails. >> gere: meditating
's hunger for religion and spirituality. out there, far away from the hustle and bustle of the city, you feel close to nature. you have time and no clocks. you feel you have become part of the natural cycle. today, there are still hermits who choose to live in solitude. one man in northeastern poland moved to the forests where he created his own world. >> 20 years ago, christoph, now 60, decided to live in nature. in a 600 square kilometer national park on the belarussian border. >> nothing happens here. life is quieter and more stable than in the city. it is life for the sake of life. i love living here. i hope i will make it to 100. i try to get a little closer to nature every day. eventually nature will swallow me up, and i will merge with it, and i will be here forever. >> the former used bookstore manager from warsaw is now a hermit, an eccentric, a human who loves nature above all else. he and his 22 dogs have taken up residence in an old cat and on the edge of the forest. his nearest neighbors are several kilometers away. he is a keen collector of simple folk art, but his real pas
of the basic values, like freedom of expression, religion, so we are going to fight it, and one of our first platforms will be to abolish or of the very least amend the constitution. -- or at the very least abolished -- amend the constitution. >> they expect the crisis to end soon. >> it is not against the regime. that is very bad for the country -- country. we are losing almost 50 million american dollars a day, and the egyptian government is not strong enough. >> many egyptians are tired of the political upheaval. looking to bring civility. others are afraid the country could be moving towards an islamic state. egypt is deeply divided about its future. bbc news, cairo. >> the former president of south africa, nelson mandela, is said to be spending christmas in the hospital. he was admitted two weeks ago because of a lung infection, but while in the hospital, he was also treated for gallstones, and doctors say he is not quite ready to be allowed home. we resent this update from johannesburg. >> nelson mandela was admitted to the hospital, and now, it appears he will not be discharged in tim
grounds and graces and rewill i go religions and around music they would all come together. i felt it would be like a very good platform for fortune 500 companies to market their products. >> what greeting did you havewhen you tried to bridge that gap? greeting? well it was tough in the beginning, tom. you are basically trying to get a company of a large organization who was used to marketing a certain way to deal with a shipment. shipment -- shift. a cultural shift. my biggest allies was when these ceo's had teenagers in their household. the teenagers would be list ening to music or partaking in something that the parents didn't ugs and they ugs ugs understand and they would an affinity for. it was a lot of corporations that were suffering because they could not get the next generation to adapt and partake in their product offering. >> what is the opportunity outthere for a young he were con-- younger consumer for these not only consumer goods companies and financial services companies that cuts across all industries. what is the opportunity? >> it was easy in the 70s and80s to us
on the basis -- outlawed discrimination on the basis of discrimination -- religion, and sex. and 1950s, law firms, and some of the finest graduates were saying they wanted no women. they would feel uncomfortable dealing with a woman, or as often her, we hired a woman at this from once, and she was dreadful. how many men did they hire that didn't work out? so it wasn't easy to get that first job. first job was all important because if you got it and performed well, then the next job was secure. well, i had a great professor, someone may know you -- some of you may know his name, he was the first constitutional law scholar, and he was in charge of getting judicial clerkship for columbia law school students. and i was special. he was determined to give me a federal clerkship. so he recommended me to a judge who always hired his law clerks from columbia. and then -- [inaudible] is ruth bader ginsburg. she has a four year old daughter. how can i rely on her? and the professor said, give her a chance. if she doesn't work out, there's a man in her class who will step in and take over for her. if y
a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek state about the construction and commitment. >> there is still resistance. well over 90% of greeks are orthodox christians. while many accept the moscow plan, many are opposed resentful of mass migration here. >> greece fought hundreds of centuries of terrorism -- of tyranny by muslims. we totally oppose this. >> pride in their own faith is clear, but can they resist the respect of the other? this is a country where religion is intrinsic to national identity, where church and state are intimately linked. the
religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking then the only thing that you can do is to leave. but 19 years are part of my best years in my musical career. so i said, you know, to explain exactly details what happened is impossible. and the newspapers generally made a mess of the entire story because they didn't know exactly the details. they thought that the orchestra was against me but this is not true. >> not true, absolutely not true. i never had a fight with an orchestra in my life. but there were reasons outside of the artistic field that created a situation and we couldn't kmup kate any more. we had completely different ideas. >> there was no one that could have
many ethnicities, nationalities, religions, and yet we are bound together as one people because of our allegiance and our respect and our reverence for the constitution, and this is a link, a tie, a bond to our history and to our heritage. that is unique or almost unique in the world. this tie that we have to our constitution that defines us gives us stability and a purpose and a mission to our people. and it is the envy of the rest of the world. the british revere their constitution as well. not quite the same. william gladstone, prime minister of england, at one time talked -- compared the american and thening lish -- the english constitution. he began by saying the english constitution was grown, the american substitution was something that was made. if you ended there, you might have thought it was rather patronizing, the english constitution was made and the american constitution, made. he went on to refer to the american constitution in the most laudatory an complementary of terms. he said in that same statement, just as the british constitution is the most shuttle organism ever
their religion. in fact, restrictions on baha'is extend far beyond their religious practices to further restrict their civil rights and their human rights. many members of the baha'i faith living in iran are even subject to harassment, to persecution by the regime and others with extensive reports of confiscation of property, restrictions on travel and raids on baha'i homes and businesses. the iranian government continues to arrest and detain baha'is based on their religious beliefs with at least 60 cases logged last year alone. the members of the national leadership of baha'is in iran arrested in 2008 and unfairly tried with minimal access to their defense attorneys are now serving a 20-year sentence for crimes, crimes including insulting religious sanctity and propaganda against the regime. the government maintains possession of many baha'i properties that were seized following the 1979 revolution, including holy places, cemeteries and historical sites. many of those properties have now been destroyed. baha'is are barred from leadership positions in the government and are only permits to enrol
," john barry recounts the life of the theologian and his thoughts on the division of religion and politics. former secretary of state madeleine albright recounts her childhood in czechoslovakia during the nazi invasion in "prague winter." in bill veeck, paul dickson details the life of the advocate for racial equality and players' economic rights. damien ec cols in "life after death." for an extended links of various publications' 2012 notable book
. [applause] >> tonight, religion and politics with analyst george will. followed by a discussion on climate science and politics. and later, james hansen. >> tomorrow on washington journal, we will talk about the latest on the fiscal cliff with a columnist. that is followed by a look at president obama's cabinet for his second term. our guest is reporter david jackson. and then a look at what is next for iraq. we are joined by author michael gordon. live at 7:00 eastern on c- span. >> i started to get word in the summer and fall of 1774. the british out of roles and diplomats were reporting to the crown the colonists are sending ships everye
and personal liberty? why does the use of religion to support a social gospel and preemptive wars, both of which require of their terrance to use violence or the threat of violence, go unchallenged -- authoritarians to use of violence or the threat of violence, go unchallenged? why do we allow the government and federal reserve to disseminate false information dealing with both economics and foreign policy? why is democracy held in such high esteem, when it is the enemy of the minority, and makes all rights relative to the dictates of the majority? why should anyone be surprised that congress has no credibility, since there is such a disconnect between what politicians say and what they do? is there any explanation for all of the deception, and happiness, fear of the future, loss of confidence in our leaders -- unhappiness, fear of the future, loss of confidence in our leaders? yes, there is. the negative perceptions are logical. identification of the problems and recognizing becausthe causew the proper changes to come more easily. we should have trust in ourselves, less in the governme
and various cities, there's no room for kids and not even a thought process. let's face it, religion is on the slide in terms of the major politics are in the newspaper. let's talk about those. >> i'm not a regulation man but we are fooling with the cycle of life. the cycle of life means you replace yourself for the next generation. western economies rely on growth. you stop growing, you're like a sha shark, you die, we need to do that for the debts we're piling up. what fuels growth is the next generation of young workerings. young workers are not coming into the workforce. look at southern europe with youth unemployment. take 15% youth unemployment in spain and compound that with the fact they stop having babies. what happens in a generation or two. >> i tell you, bill, you got me thinking, i encourage readers to read this. in some of the biggest developed economies pushed the most growth are below a 2% utility rate. this has to be dealt with at some point. back to you. >> thanks, rick. >>> road trip and big bank is in highways an byways in the road for yield. we'll explain how. an
this week and there were a few issues raised by support. number one is the religion has totally for ben for gay people to get married. second of all we have others who did mention earlier about equal opportunity that every person has the right to get married regardless of whether they are male or female. the last plane like to make it say what this young person who can say to to me they shouldn't have been voted for the make your mark ballot. instead it should have been young people and the police, which is by far more important. thank you. [applause] >> and i'm not just to say because they see a small number of people standing up who have spoken before and i welcome your csm, but in fairness to people who haven't had a chance to speak, i need to be looking for those who have not spoken before the debate. the woman in the back row. yes, it is you. >> i am representing. it is love, care and dedication between two people. if those two people know they love each other, is it unfair to say they need to have it written on paper and writing on paper for his love more important. there are othe
will on the historical link between religion and politics. at 10:50, singer-songwriter and james taylor, on c-span. >> the senate returns to legislative business on thursday and house as a performance session scheduled that day. the senate is in at 10:00 a.m. eastern for work on two bills. the first would extend provisions of the foreign intelligence surveillance act. the other is a relief package for those affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on our companion network, c-span2. house members are on standby as negotiations continue on the so- called fiscal cliff. >host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and health benefits could be impacted. joining us is josh boak. when we are talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are talking about here? guest: unemployment insurance is a combination of federal and state program. usually last 62 weeks. it is that extension beyond that six months time frame that we are talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. that is what automatically expires. we know that it costs about $30 billio
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)